Society & Environments

Podcast Episodes

#92 The Health Gap with Sir Michael Marmot

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Show Notes

#85 Development origins of health and disease with Prof Craig Pennell

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Show Notes

#70 Obesity and systems thinking with Prof Boyd Swinburn

Listen on Apple Podcasts | Show Notes

Online Resources

Is the path to health the same path to environmental sustainability? An article by Dr. Sam

Tobacco Free Portfolios: To inform, prioritise and advance tobacco-free finance by eliminating tobacco from investment portfolios across the globe.

Doctors for the Environment: The only organisation of medical professionals (including GPs, surgeons, anaesthetists and more) in Australia solely focused on promoting good health through care of the environment.

Climate and Health Alliance: A coalition of health care stakeholders who wish to see the threat to human health from climate change and ecological degradation addressed through prompt policy action.

Books

The Health Gap, Sir Michael Marmot

There are dramatic differences in health between countries and within countries. But this is not a simple matter of rich and poor. A poor man in Glasgow is rich compared to the average Indian, but the Glaswegian’s life expectancy is 8 years shorter. The Indian is dying of infectious disease linked to his poverty; the Glaswegian of violent death, suicide, heart disease linked to a rich country’s version of disadvantage. In all countries, people at relative social disadvantage suffer health disadvantage, dramatically so. Within countries, the higher the social status of individuals the better is their health. These health inequalities defy usual explanations. Conventional approaches to improving health have emphasised access to technical solutions – improved medical care, sanitation, and control of disease vectors; or behaviours – smoking, drinking – obesity, linked to diabetes, heart disease and cancer. These approaches only go so far. Creating the conditions for people to lead flourishing lives, and thus empowering individuals and communities, is key to reduction of health inequalities.

The Status Syndrome, Sir Michael Marmot

Why do Oscar winners live for an average of four years longer than other Hollywood actors?
Who experiences the most stress – the decision-makers or those who carry out their orders?
Why do the Japanese have better health than other rich populations, and Keralans in India have better health than other poor populations – and what do they have in common?
In this eye-opening book, internationally renowned epidemiologist Michael Marmot sets out to answer these and many other fascinating questions in order to understand the relationship between where we stand in the social hierarchy and our health and longevity. It is based on more than thirty years of front-line research between health and social circumstances. Marmot’s work has taken him round the world showing the similar patterns that could be affecting the length of your life – and how you can change it.

RetroSuburbia: The downshifter’s guide to a resilient future, David Holmgren

This 592 page manual shows how Australians can downshift and retrofit their homes, gardens, communities and, above all, themselves to be more self-organised, sustainable and resilient into an uncertain future. It promises a challenging but exciting mix of satisfying work, a more meaningful way of living and hope for the next generation.

Apps

Online Courses

Other Podcasts

Healthy Eating

Physical Activity

Restful Sleep

Stress Management

Connection

Coaching & Behaviour Change

Society & Environments

Meaning & Culture

Personal Development